Marine Resource Studies

Environmental Field Studies Abroad

Marine Resource Studies

The School for Field Studies (SFS) semester and summer programs in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) provide students with the opportunity to conduct field research that provides the local government, community, and tourism developers with recommendations that will help sustain the economic, social, and ecological stability of South Caicos. Snorkeling and SCUBA diving in waters surrounding South Caicos, students learn to identify and observe the behavior of marine species, assess coastal and marine habitats, and quantify fisheries resources through hours of training, observation, and study in the water. SEMESTER PROGRAM TCI has an extensive network of 34 protected areas, but little is known about their function and effectiveness. With the Admiral Cockburn Land and Sea National Park and East Harbour Lobster and Conch Reserve at their doorstep, students evaluate the concept and practice of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a resource management tool. Through field observation, exercises, and research, students will gain the concepts, skills, and data to understand the marine ecosystems , island community dynamics, and resource management. SUMMER PROGRAMS Each 4-credit summer session may be taken individually or in combination. Session I: Tropical Marine Ecosystems: Monitoring and Management Students in this study abroad program will learn about key aspects of environmental assessment and management of tropical marine ecosystems and explore sustainable development strategies for the Turks and Caicos at a local and global scale. Students support the work of our clients and stakeholders, who range from local fishers to members of key government agencies. Session II: Applied Marine Research Techniques Students in this study abroad program will learn about developing scientific approaches to identify key problems affecting the health of coral reefs, seagrass beds, and mangrove forests that surround the island Students support the work of our clients and stakeholders, who range from local fishers to members of key government agencies.

Subjects

  • Biology (General)
  • Environmental Management Systems / Policy
  • Environmental Management
  • Environmental Studies
  • Marine Biology
  • Marine Science
  • Tropical Biology

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The School for Field Studies

100 Cummings Center, Suite 534-G, Beverly, MA 01915 USA

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The School for Field Studies

100 Cummings Center, Suite 534-G, Beverly, MA 01915 USA

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