Wildlife Management Studies

Environmental Field Studies Abroad

Wildlife Management Studies

The School for Field Studies (SFS) semester and summer programs in Tanzania allow students to examine the drivers of habitat degradation and land-use change, as well as the implications for both local economic livelihoods and wildlife conservation. Students gain a general overview of cultural perceptions, conservation issues, wildlife dispersal areas, and biodiversity conservation in Tanzania, and have a chance to learn and apply in the field multiple techniques and approaches to studying wildlife, natural resources, and ecosystems. SEMESTER PROGRAM The curriculum and research of the Wildlife Management Studies semester program focus on determining how changes in land-use and resource availability in the Maasai steppe ecosystems can be managed in such a way as to foster the well-being of local communities while safeguarding and promoting biodiversity conservation. SUMMER PROGRAMS Each 4-credit session can be taken individually or in combination. Session I: Wildlife Management and Conservation Students in this program are exposed to wildlife management practices and the complex issues involving sustainable wildlife conservation in the Tarangire-Manyara ecosystem of Tanzania. The course combines concepts and principles of ecology, natural resource management, and socioeconomics which are central to effective and sustainable wildlife conservation. During the course, students develop skills to explore the ecology, social organization, and behavior of common African large mammals. Session II: Techniques for Wildlife Field Research Students learn a suite of wildlife field techniques and methods routinely used to assess wildlife ecology and management policies and practices in East Africa with specific application to the Tanzania Tarangire-Manyara ecosystem conservation areas. The focus is multidisciplinary and reflects the complex realities of balancing ecological, economic, and socio-cultural factors in sustainable wildlife conservation and management studies.

Subjects

  • Biology (General)
  • Anthropology
  • Social Sciences
  • Environmental Studies
  • Environmental Management
  • Environmental Management Systems / Policy
  • Research Study
  • African Studies

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The School for Field Studies

100 Cummings Center, Suite 534-G, Beverly, MA 01915 USA

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The School for Field Studies

100 Cummings Center, Suite 534-G, Beverly, MA 01915 USA

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